Asthma Stories chapter 3: Living with Asthma

When is the last time you thought about breathing? For most of us, it’s something that we take for granted. But we never realize how much air we need, until we can’t get enough.

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For those living with inadequately controlled asthma, breathing is at the forefront of their mind from the moment they wake up; to the moment they go to sleep.1

In the final chapter of our Asthma Stories series, we spoke to three people living with asthma, as well as Dr Fabio Giron from Weill Cornell Medicine, to explore the impact the disease has on their day-to-day lives, and what could help them in the future.

 

Asthma can have an enormous impact on people’s wellbeing if the disease isn’t adequately controlled.2,3 When patients are breathless, they can be left feeling stressed and irritable, meaning they often isolate themselves from social situations. Physical activities that they previously enjoyed can become a thing of the past, and certain careers may mean people have to rely heavily on their rescue inhaler just to get them through the day.4

If people with asthma were able to receive information on their inhalation and track their inhaler usage, they could then share this information with their HCP, giving them a more complete picture of how they’re managing their disease.5,6

At Teva, we are at the forefront of research to help the millions of people living with asthma and their HCPs. Stay informed with the latest information on our vision for the future of respiratory care, with our email updates, and discover more in chapters 1 and 2 of our Asthma Stories series.

References

  1. Difficult to control asthma. Available at: https://www.asthma.org.uk/advice/understanding-asthma/types/difficult-control-asthma/. Accessed: November 2018.
  2. Sadatsafavi M et al. Value Health 2015; 18(8): 1043–1049.
  3. Sundbom F et al. J Asthma 2016; 53(4): 398–403.
  4. Having asthma at work. Available at: https://www.asthma.org.uk/advice/living-with-asthma/work/. Accessed: November 2018.
  5. Foster JM et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014; 134(6): 1260–1268.
  6. Morton RW et al. Thorax 2016; 0: 1–8.

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