Asthma Stories: Treatment Initiation

Imagine being given flat-pack furniture, and having to build it at home—without any instructions. How would you know if you’re doing it right?

Read more

Read full article

Imagine being given flat-pack furniture, and having to build it at home – without any instructions. How would you know if you’re doing it right? Well, this mirrors our current expectations for people with asthma. After diagnosis, they are expected to operate in the dark, as we expect them to immediately use their inhalers correctly at home.

Evidence suggests that poor inhaler use is a common problem. In a systematic review of 144 studies, data from 54,354 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma was collected to assess inhaler technique (59,584 observed cases). Results revealed that only 31% of patients used their inhaler correctly.1 Moreover, inadequate inhaler instruction and poor inhaler technique are known contributors of suboptimal control of COPD, poor clinical outcomes and treatment non-adherence.2

If patients have been prescribed multiple inhalers, each to be taken at a different time of day, with a unique way of using it, how will they know if they’re getting it right?

In the first chapter our Asthma Stories series, we spoke to three real people with asthma to find out the challenges they have faced when using inhalers in the management of their asthma. We also spoke to Dr Fabio Giron from Weill Cornell Medicine, to discover the worries many HCPs have when prescribing that first inhaler treatment.

 

Both people with asthma and their HCPS are often in the dark about whether inhalers are being used correctly. The precise technique needed is not instinctive. If users receive information on their inhalation, they could receive feedback on their inhalation technique and that the inhaler is being used properly.

At Teva, we are at the forefront of making this a reality for the millions of people living with asthma and their HCPs. Stay informed with the latest information on our vision for the future of respiratory care, with our monthly updates, and discover more in the next chapter of our series, ‘Asthma Stories: ongoing monitoring’.

References

1. Sanchis J et al. Chest. 2016; 150(2): 394–406.
2. Amin AN et al. Patient Prefer Adherence 2017; 11: 1205–1212.

RESP-42046 November 2019

Related articles

Stay informed

Stay informed with our monthly updates which contain the latest information on the future of connected respiratory and healthcare innovation.